Credits to the Chicken with Catherine Oliver

2022-07-29T16:47:17+02:00

  Dr Catherine Oliver is a geographer and researcher currently working with urban chickens and keepers in London at the Department of Geography, University of Cambridge. From September of this year, she will be relocating to Lancaster University where she will be a Lecturer in the Sociology of Climate Change. Catherine published her first book, Veganism, Archives and Animals, with Routledge in 2021 and writes widely about animals

Credits to the Chicken with Catherine Oliver2022-07-29T16:47:17+02:00

Witchcraft made Science with Nella Piatek

2022-05-04T19:18:40+02:00

Witchcraft made Science with Nella Piatek This podcast is part of the Witchcraft made Science series, a collaboration with curator Lieke Wouters. In this podcast, we approach the witch as a stereotype as well as a new feminist icon. Making space for the spiritual, the scientific and the sceptical aspects of witchcraft, all seen from an artistic lens. In this episode, we welcome designer and researcher

Witchcraft made Science with Nella Piatek2022-05-04T19:18:40+02:00

Witchcraft made Science with Anna McCarthy

2022-04-05T10:34:48+02:00

Podcast edit by Reon Cordova. Witchcraft made Science with Anna McCarthy This podcast is part of the Witchcraft made Science series, a collaboration with curator Lieke Wouters. In this podcast, we approach the witch as a stereotype as well as a new feminist icon. Making space for the spiritual, the scientific and the sceptical aspects of witchcraft, all seen from an artistic lens. In this

Witchcraft made Science with Anna McCarthy2022-04-05T10:34:48+02:00

Animal Technology with Ilyena Hirskyj-Douglas

2022-03-30T17:01:54+02:00

    Ilyena Hirskyj-Douglas is Lecturer/Assistant Professor in Animal-Computer Interaction at The University of Glasgow in Scotland (UK). Her research explores how animals interact with computer systems and how to designing and build methods to capture this interaction. She is interested in exploring what it means for animals to interact with technologies and how we can create, design, and support meaningful exchanges between humans, animals, and

Animal Technology with Ilyena Hirskyj-Douglas2022-03-30T17:01:54+02:00

Witchcraft made Science with Alexandra Neuman

2022-03-24T09:45:32+01:00

This podcast is part of the Witchcraft made Science series, a collaboration with curator Lieke Wouters. In this podcast, we approach the witch as a stereotype as well as a new feminist icon. Making space for the spiritual, the scientific and the sceptical aspects of witchcraft, all seen from an Alexandra Neuman is an interdisciplinary reptile currently based in Brooklyn, New York. Drawing on ideas

Witchcraft made Science with Alexandra Neuman2022-03-24T09:45:32+01:00

Witchcraft made Science with Emily Pelstring

2022-03-03T14:22:03+01:00

This podcast is part of the Witchcraft made Science series, a collaboration with curator Lieke Wouters. In this podcast, we approach the witch as a stereotype as well as a new feminist icon. Making space for the spiritual, the scientific and the sceptical aspects of witchcraft, all seen from an artistic lens. In this episode, we welcome artist and researcher Emily Pelstring. Emily Pelstring is an artist

Witchcraft made Science with Emily Pelstring2022-03-03T14:22:03+01:00

Voicing Non-human Life with Klaas Kuitenbrouwer

2022-04-22T12:25:04+02:00

Klaas Kuitenbrouwer studied history at the University of Utrecht, developed an art practice that moved into the field of digital culture. Since the late1990ies Klaas works at the intersections of culture, technology and ecology and I research, curate and moderate events in this field.  Currently, he work as researcher at Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam, primarily in the context of digital culture. Klaas was responsible for –

Voicing Non-human Life with Klaas Kuitenbrouwer2022-04-22T12:25:04+02:00

You Contain Multitudes – J. Lee Nelson

2022-02-10T10:12:03+01:00

Dr. J. Lee Nelson studies microchimerism, a state in which cells exchanged by mother and child during pregnancy persist in both individuals for many years. Her interdisciplinary research team investigates the health consequences of this phenomenon. In 1998, Dr. Nelson reported the first study linking an autoimmune disease with the lasting presence of fetal cells in mothers. Because women generally develop autoimmune diseases more often than

You Contain Multitudes – J. Lee Nelson2022-02-10T10:12:03+01:00
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